Category Archives: Wildfowl

Which Cackler?

Prompted by the last post on the subject, Minimal Interest, Joan Chaplin sent me these images of a Cackling Goose at Foxholes Fisheries, Crick from 23rd April 2012. This bird arrived with visiting Canada Geese and was subsequently thought to … Continue reading

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Minimal Interest

That’s what this Cackling Goose at Daventry CP today is likely to elicit. Apparently it has been present two weeks among the local Canada Geese and, given its range along the western seaboard of North America, and its time and … Continue reading

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Ruddy Shelducks: Northamptonshire and the European Perspective

It has been less than a year since I summarised the Northamptonshire status of Ruddy Shelduck and speculated on the possible origins of birds visiting the county. There is an annual pattern of late summer/early autumn occurrences which ties in … Continue reading

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Marbled Duck at Stanwick Gravel Pits

The Marbled Duck, first discovered by Steve Fisher at Stanwick GP’s main lake on 13th January and still present today, promptly disappeared almost immediately until rediscovery on 19th February. Or did it? With persistent inclement weather, rising water levels and … Continue reading

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Wood Duck

Found by Jack Douglas, this female Wood Duck has been present along an overgrown stretch of the River Nene, between B&Q and Carlsberg, Northampton, for approximately two weeks and is still present today. Although common in the USA, where it … Continue reading

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Goosander Gander

For the past few years Goosanders have become regular winter visitors to Abington Park Lakes in Northampton. The largest, middle lake is very shallow and provides opportunities for the Goosanders to catch fish with relative ease while offering birders the … Continue reading

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Peak Practice

We all know what Lesser Scaup looks like, right? One of the key ID features is head shape, which shows a small peak at the rear of the crown. Well here’s a Greater Scaup which breaks the rules. Photographed by … Continue reading

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